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Which generation buys more homes than any other

The cost of living has turned the typical family household construct on its head.

According to a recent survey from the Pew Research Center, approximately 15 percent of millennials age 25 and 35 years still live with their parents. Compare that to the 10 percent of 25- to 35-year-old Generation Xers who were living with their parents in 2000 or the 8 percent of 25- to 35-year-old baby boomers who did the same in 1981.

So it may come as a bit of a surprise that, contrary to what the polls suggest, millennials represent the largest group of individuals who are in the market to buy a house.

Millennials run the real estate market

That's according to a recent survey from the National Association of Realtors. In its Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study, the NAR found that 36 percent of residential real estate transactions during the past year involved 18- to 35-year-old men and women. This includes all housing types - townhouses, co-ops and condominiums - and not just single-family residences. That's up from 34 percent over the corresponding period in 2017. These figures are well ahead of Generation X buyers, who made up 26 percent of all home purchases in the past year.

What drives millennial homebuying?

Why are millennials accounting for a larger slice of the homebuyer pie? It's partly due to their spending capabilities. The typical millennial household makes around $88,200 per year, up from $82,000 in the 2017 version of the NAR's Generational Trends analysis.

For about 1 millennial homebuyer in 5, these purchases represent their introduction to homeownership. In other words, buying a home means leaving the nest for the first time.

Millennials are loath to move as a rule, but are also living with their folks for longer periods than their older contemporaries. In fact, 91 percent of the 25- to 35-year-old respondents in the aforementioned Pew Research poll who are currently living with their parents had lived at home for at least 12 months. The same was true for 86 percent of the same demographic of Generation Xers in the 2000s.

Everyone's situation is different, but if nothing else, the numbers suggest more millennials are proving their fiscal mettle and learning that the American dream is still alive.