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Home sales are down. What that means for you

Home sales are down: What that means for you

If you're considering buying a new house, you've probably noticed the pace of people purchasing homes continues to rise in many areas nationwide. But, if you take a more recent look at the data, the trend has shifted a bit in many regions.

According to the latest figures from the National Association of Realtors, existing sales have fallen for three consecutive months. The most recent evidence was in June 2018, when transactions dropped approximately 0.6 percent from May and 2.2 percent on a year-over-year basis.

The same was true among pending home sales, a statistic that measures contract signings which have decreased for six months in a row, NAR revealed, sliding 2.5 percent on an annual basis.

Even newly constructed single-family property buys dipped in summer's opening month. As noted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, new-home sales plunged nearly 5.5 percent in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 631,000 units.

So, what does this all mean for you? If you're a first-time homebuyer aiming to land a residence at a price you can afford, here's what you may be able to expect should the trend continue:

Home prices poised to pull back

Perhaps the only thing more certain than Americans buying homes is the upward trajectory of asking prices. The median for existing homes climbed yet again in June, marking the 76th straight month they've done so on an annual basis, NAR reported. However, with home sales down virtually across the board, the direction of home values may follow suit. What's been preventing this from happening sooner is supply not being replenished at a fast enough clip.

But the inventory situation appears to be improving, based on the most up to date numbers from the NAR. At the conclusion of June, unsold properties totaled around 1.9 million, the equivalent of a 4.3-month supply, according to NAR. This means it would take right around a quarter of the year for inventory to run dry were no other properties to enter listings. The most noteworthy aspect of these numbers is 1.9 million. Up 0.5 percent from a year ago, it's the first time in three years that inventory rose compared to 12 months earlier.

Listings to remain 'active' for longer

Twenty-six days: That's how long it takes before a for-sale house is snatched up by a prospective buyer, according to NAR's latest figures, down from 28 days compared to last June. In fact, more than half of the houses that sold then were on the market for a month or less. That houses are claimed so quickly can be extremely frustrating, but if the sales slowdown persists, those for-sale signs should hang around for lengthier stretches.

Waiting until winter may be wise

When is the best time to buy a house? That's a question all prospective buyers asks themselves at some point. Generally speaking, it's the summertime, when more listings become available with kids out of school and the weather pleasant. However, if you're looking to buy at a low price, it may behoove you to wait until the temperatures plunge. Real estate professionals note that buying in the winter can really pay off - literally - because if sellers haven't had luck, they'll be more inclined to sell for less than their initial price point. And if the sales dip continues, that's a scenario you're bound to happen upon.

The housing market is a roll of the dice - you never know what's going to happen from one moment to the next. But if you play your cards right, slumping sales can work to your benefit.