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Knowledge Center



Cyber Security: Strong Passwords

Best practices for strong passwords:

Cybersecurity is critical, both in your personal and professional life, and passwords are the first line of defense against imposters gaining access to your accounts. The Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report found over 70% of employees reuse passwords at work. The report also states 81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged either stolen and/or weak passwords.

Follow the tips below to make sure that you are setting strong passwords to protect your accounts and information online.

Password Do’s:

  • Use a password manager: Password managers are online services that safely store and manage your passwords. Your passwords will be encrypted, so it is a secure way to keep them all in one easy to find place.
  • Change your password regularly: This will make it less likely that your accounts will be compromised.
  • Make your passwords long: Advanced hackers can use computer programs that run through every combination of numbers and letters. The longer and more complex your password is, the harder it is to crack!
  • Mix up symbols and numbers with letters: An example of this technique is using the number 1 in place of a lowercase letter l.
  • Use nonsense sequences of letters and numbers: This will make it more difficult for someone to guess your logins and harder for advanced technology to crack your passwords.

Password Don’ts:

  • Don’t use the same password for everything: If you do, and an imposter gets your password for one account they can use it for all the other services and platforms you have.
  • Don’t keep passwords in areas people can access: Storing logins in your desk or easy to access places in your computer puts you at risk. Instead use a password manager that encrypts your passwords for you.
  • Don’t use common words or phrases: If the letter sequences you use are found in the dictionary, an intruder will be able to crack your passwords easier.
  • Don’t use personal information: Logins that include birthdays, names of loved ones, or streets you grew up on will make it easy for someone to hack your accounts.

Don’t give your password to anyone: Not even coworkers or good friends.